Research Corner

PROJECT NEWS & ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dot Com Archive Launched

The companion to the Business Plan Archive, the Dot Com Archive, is now online and accepting contributions. We are inviting anyone who worked in, founded or even just lived through the Dot Com Era to tell us about their experience. The Dot Com Archive is at www.dotcomarchive.org.

Here is the text of the announcement:

Help Write the History of the Dot Com Era

Did you work for a dot com, new media, or internet technology company? Are you an entrepreneur who founded your own technology company? The Dot Com Archive, a non-profit research project at the Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland is interested in hearing from you. Contribute your memories, thoughts and digital documents at www.dotcomarchive.org.

In years to come, the Dot Com Era will be remembered as a watershed event in the history of American business and culture, on par with, if not more important than, other notable moments in American business history like the Roaring Twenties or the Railroad Boom of the mid-19th century. You have a unique opportunity to help write the history of this period, and to make sure that all relevant perspectives are included. Our primary goal is to preserve a wide-ranging record of the Dot Com Era for future historians. The recollections of all types of participants are an essential part of this record.

We are also seeking business plans, emails, PowerPoint presentations, photos, promotional items, and any other digital or physical materials you may have that can help tell the story of individual companies. To see some of our growing collection of corporate documents relating to technology companies formed during the 1990s you can visit the Business Plan Archive at www.businessplanarchive.org.

If you have any questions about any aspect of the project, please contact either Dalit Baranoff (dbaranof@rhsmith.umd.edu) or David Kirsch (dkirsch@rhsmith.umd.edu), and thank you in advance for your willingness to help others learn from the past.



Posted by David Kirsch on Aug 02, 2004 | Comments (0)